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“Sumptuous recording the Gloriæ Dei forces have made of it.... it is a major triumph”
Journal of the Association of Anglican Musicians

A premiere recording of a profound oratorio-style work based on the vivid poetry of James Weldon Johnson. Gordon Myers’ music is eclectic, bringing together the sound of spirituals, jazz, brass, and the concert hall to illuminate the text.

Premiere and Only Works

Track 1 Listen, Lord - A Prayer
Track 2 The Creation
Track 3 The Prodigal Son
Track 4 Go Down, Death - A Funeral
Track 5 Noah Built the Ark
Track 6 The Crucifixion
Track 7 The Judgement Day

Critical Acclaim

 

  • “Gloriæ Dei Cantores … show their incredible versatility.”
    Cross Accent
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  • “... it is necessary to have a voice with great distinction and dramatic, compelling power. [Gordon] Myers still had that voice in 1995. The most notable aspect of Myers’s singing is diction.”
     
    “The Gloriæ Dei Cantores ... is conducted by Elizabeth C. Patterson. The ensemble’s choral sound is in tune, with a wide range of dynamics required by the text. The Gloriæ Dei Brass Ensemble performs with notable vitality underscoring the dramatic focal points of the work.”
     
    “This recording is an excellent addition to the storehouse of musical Americana.”
    Choral Journal
  • “My long-standing love affair with James Weldon Johnson’s classic God’s Trombones was sparked anew by this splendid 78 minute cantata and the tonally sumptuous recording the Gloriæ Dei forces have made of it .... it is a major triumph for the Paraclete operation to have secured his (Gordon Myers) participation in this venture.”
    “This is an important work which deserves to be heard, known, and widely appreciated.”
    Journal of the Association of Anglican Musicians
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  • “The singing is top notch and the performances bloom with drama and gravity. Myers’ voice is potent and exact and the choir inspired. This is a piece of music that deserves to be heard and preserved.”
    All About Jazz

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